Gas Chromatography - Tandem Techniques - The Combination of the Gas Chromatograph with Other Spectroscopic Systems > Combined Instruments > Page 10

The early combined instruments usually consisted of a standard gas chromatograph and a standard spectrometer as separate entities connected by a suitable interface system. The interface could range in complexity from a simple heated capillary tube of appropriate dimensions to a complicated form of concentrator, which selectively removed the carrier gas and, at the same time, concentrated the solute into a smaller elution volume. It was extremely important that any interface was designed to minimize any peak dispersion so that the integrity of the separation was maintained while passing through the interface. The design of such interfaces will also be discussed later in this book. Due to the GC/Spectroscopy combination being formed by the association of individual instruments, the early overall apparatus was bulky and occupied a considerable amount of bench (and often floor) space. Modern combined instruments are designed as one entity and, thus conserves space `and can be easily accommodated in most modern laboratories. A typical modern GC/MS combined instrument marketed by Agilent Technolgies is shown in figure 7. The instrument has a fairly comprehensive set of additional ancillary instrumentation including

Combined Instruments

 

The early combined instruments usually consisted of a standard gas chromatograph and a standard spectrometer as separate entities connected by a suitable interface system. The interface could range in complexity from a simple heated capillary tube of appropriate dimensions to a complicated form of concentrator, which selectively removed the carrier gas and, at the same time, concentrated the solute into a smaller elution volume. It was extremely important that any interface was designed to minimize any peak dispersion so that the integrity of the separation was maintained while passing through the interface. The design of such interfaces will also be discussed later in this book. Due to the GC/Spectroscopy combination being formed by the association of individual instruments, the early overall apparatus was bulky and occupied a considerable amount of bench (and often floor) space. Modern combined instruments are designed as one entity and, thus conserves space `and can be easily accommodated in most modern laboratories. A typical modern GC/MS combined instrument marketed by Agilent Technolgies is shown in figure 7. The instrument has a fairly comprehensive set of additional ancillary instrumentation including

 

 

Courtesy of Agilent Technologies

 

Figure 7. A Typical Modern GC/MS Combined Instrument